Remember the two sides of the furnishing spectrum currently battling their way from my brain into my hypothetical purchasing decisions? (If not, catch up here and here). Well, today's interior inspo post is showing you (me, really) some ways in which the minimal and the homey - the eclectic really - can be reconciled and no longer be doomed to remain forever on my Pinterest boards, my hands tied from fear of buyers remorse (decorator's regret?).

The key seems to be subdued tones, livened up with eclectic shapes, textures, and more personal, haphazard elements.


Exhibit A:  The colors here are limited to white, brown, black, and that tiny pop of mustard yellow. However, the interest is created by things like herringbone flooring, the wall's molding, the weathered wood on the wall, the curves of the figurine on the credenza, and the mix of all of this with mid-century modern furniture.

Below we see a similar equation: restricted palette, interesting architectural features and personal details like the plant, the rugs, and the items on the mantle. Most of these images have similar palettes, however they all differ in styles and *vibes*...






This last image I included because there is literally almost no color - but I'm quite drawn to it despite the fact that super minimalist palettes are not really my thing. This is not minimalist as a whole however - don't quote me on that, I'm not majoring in interior design movements - and the shapes create some depth that I find, is missing from many contemporary / modern design techniques. I especially like the haphazardly stashed writing utensils on the desk and the rolls of paper leaning on the wall in the corner. 

In addition to all of this though, I like the play between styles from a range of time periods and there is certainly some of that here - the mid century chair on herringbone flooring, and the slightly anachronistic cabinet in the back, a mix between campaign furnishings and those old labeled file cabinets libraries used to keep their Dewey decimal system cards in. 

So, is it nostalgia

- a.